Announcing the Kodu v1.2 and the Kodu Community Website!

Kodu User
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Kodu User posted this 21 September 2011

NEW!  We are very pleased to announce Kodu v1.2 and the all-new Kodu Community Website!

What's new in Kodu 1.2?

In this release, we have added new storytelling features.  One of our most frequent questions is "how can I use Kodu to tell stories?"  The answer was that it was possible, but it took a lot of effort to make it work.

Now in v1.2, we have added a new tile, the [Said] tile.  You use the [Said] tile in conjunction with the [Hear] filter to detect when another character has said something of interest.  (No more timing responses by hand!)

Just like with other sensors, you can filter the [Hear][Said] combination not only to particular strings, but also to specific types of characters, character colors, or distances from your character.  It tries to match such that listening for "Some" will match when someone says "Something", "Some thing", or even "Some! Thing!" (this is called substring matching).  It will also ignore case, so that a character saying the word "some" (all lower case letters) will also match.

For even more flexibility, we've introduced a new "tag" system.  For example, let's suppose you want your character to react whenever it is greeted by another character.  But you don't (yet) know what all the other characters might say when they greet your character, as you haven't programmed them yet.  (Or perhaps students will be programming the other characters as an exercise.)

When programming the speaking characters, it would be nice to say that "what I am about to say is a greeting", without having to worry about what the exact string is.  Tags allow you to do exactly this!

Here is an example using tags:

In the character giving the greeting, type: WHEN: [Timer][5 seconds]  DO: [Say <tag greeting>Bonjour!!]

(This character will say "Bonjour" every 5 seconds.  And this line of text will be "tagged" as "greeting").

In the character listening for the greeting type: WHEN: [Hear][Said <tag greeting>] DO: [Score][Red][1 point]

(This will add one point to the red score every time a any "greeting" tag is heard.  Note that the actual text string "Bonjour" is *not* being compared, and you can use any tag name you choose--"greeting" was an arbitrary choice).

This is a powerful system where characters can be programmed to listen for tags (which never show on-screen), independently of the precise string being displayed in a speech bubble.

What's the Kodu Community Website?

Also new in this release is the Kodu Community Website (including the discussion forum you are reading now!)  This gives Kodu users the opportunity to share more easily, with a broader community, and to exchange ideas and feedback on the Web.

As before, anyone can share a game world they have made from within Kodu, or download and play game worlds others have made.  If users log in, they can then comment on each other's games, and they get a true "identity" on the Community site (the site will keep track of all games uploaded by a particular user, for example, to make it easy to find other great games by an author you like, for example).

New to Kodu?

Here is a link to our brief Getting Started guide.

Give these new features a try, and we'd love to know what you think!

-The Kodu Team

Post Edited 07 December 2011

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imberious
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imberious posted this 27 September 2011

Well done on the new website and community, looking forward to see some great Kodu Game Lab creations.


Richard Olsen

ideasLAB and Planet Kodu

Post Edited 27 September 2011

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Alfred
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Alfred posted this 30 September 2011
Maybe it is my advanced age but I can't seem to figure out how to get at and set tags. A picture or two would help.

Post Edited 30 September 2011

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Kodu User
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Kodu User posted this 03 October 2011

Tags are just an alternate way to "match" things that are said with things that are heard.  For instance I can program a character to say "Hey Kodu, how's it going?"  and then program another to listen for this using WHEN Hear Said and inputting the text in the Said filter that matches what the first character is saying.

An aside:  The Said filter doesn't require perfectly matching text.  You can actually have it look for a subset of the text and still work.  For instance, using the example above, if I had my character listen for "Hey Kodu" it would still match even though the first character is actually saying more.  The Said filter also ignores difference in whitespace and upper vs lower case so "Hey Kodu" will match "HEY     Kodu".

Back to tags.  Tags are added into the text box just like other text.  So I could have a character say "Hey Kodu, how's it going? <tag greeting>".  When the character says this, the tag part will not be displayed in the speech balloon above the character so it will look exactly the same as the first example.  But now the character listening can have WHEN Hear Said "<tag greeting>" in his programming and he'll detect the greeting.  We get several benefits from this:

First, you could have several characters eacvh with their own greeting ("Hello", "Howdy", "Hey") and if they're all tagged the same then then can all be detected the same.  This allows you to add a bit more variety to your game without having to do a lot of extra work.

Second, if you are trying to script a converstion you could use tags as simple as <tag line1> and <tag line2>.  This is most useful when you're conversation has multiple lines with identical dialog eg "Who's on first?".

Third (and this is the one I like) if the text the character using the Say verb is saying consists of nothing but the tag then it can still be heard but a speech balloon won't be created.  This gives you a way of sending instant messages between characters.  For instance I could program my first character with:

    WHEN Keyboard Space DO Say "<tag jump>"

and then my second character could have

    WHEN Hear Said "<tag jump>" DO Jump

Now, when I hit the space bar, the first character reacts to the input and sends the message.  The second character detects the message and jumps.  This is obvious a simplified example but I think the potential is huge.

 

Post Edited 03 October 2011

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Kodu User
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Kodu User posted this 04 October 2011

Thanks, SCoy.

I have also updated the example I provided above to actually include tags (whoops! Actually, the forum's editor stripped out the <tag> codes I had entered).  Sorry for any confusion.  :)

-Brad

Post Edited 04 October 2011

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Alfred
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Alfred posted this 04 October 2011
If you are at all like me and really need pictures you may find my post at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/alfredth/arch... helpful.

Post Edited 05 October 2011

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Tepav
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Tepav posted this 16 October 2011

BradGibson wrote:

New to Kodu?

Here is a link to our brief Getting Started guide.

Give these new features a try, and we'd love to know what you think!

The link on the Getting Started site, to the instructional videos, is broken.  I get the following error:

Server Error in '/' Application.

The resource cannot be found.

Description: HTTP 404. The resource you are looking for (or one of its dependencies) could have been removed, had its name changed, or is temporarily unavailable. Please review the following URL and make sure that it is spelled correctly.

Requested URL: /page/kodu.aspx

 

 

Post Edited 16 October 2011

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zrocweb
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zrocweb posted this 11 November 2011

When will V1.2 be released to Xbox community and how will the new version be serviced to the xbox.  Will it be like other games when an update is out there it will ask you to update it.....

 

Thanks!!!

Post Edited 11 November 2011

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Kodu User
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Kodu User posted this 11 November 2011

No idea when yet but yes, it will tell you if an update is available.

    scoy

Post Edited 11 November 2011

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